Curriculum By Grade

k12curriculum

The Pennsylvania Virtual Charter School uses K12 Inc. to meticulously research and develop curriculum that provide parents and teachers with the lessons and tools to deliver a superior education that meets or exceeds Pennsylvania state standards.

Currently available for Kindergarten through twelfth grade, the K12 Inc. program gives you unmatched flexibility in home-based learning. Better yet, families with multiple children enrolled in PA Virtual may be able to share some courses, saving you time and energy.

See the grade levels and course descriptions below to learn more. Please note that the following list is just a general guideline. Course load depends on Placement Tests and/or previous coursework.


Kindergarten Student

Language Arts Blue

    In this course, students receive structured lessons on readiness skills through emphasis on phonics, language skills, literature, and handwriting to help develop comprehension, build vocabulary, and promote a lifelong interest in reading.

Math Plus Blue

    This research-based course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. The engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course introduces students to numbers through 30. Students learn through reading, writing, counting, comparing, ordering, adding, and subtracting. They experience problem solving and encounter early concepts in place value, time, length, weight, and capacity. They learn to gather and display simple data. Students also study two- and three-dimensional figures—they identify, sort, study patterns, and relate mathematical figures to objects within their environment.

Science

    Kindergarten students begin to develop observation skills as they learn about the five senses, the Earth’s composition, and the basic needs of plants and animals. Students will also explore topics such as measurement (size, height, length, weight, capacity, and temperature), matter (solid, liquid, and gas), the seasonal cycle, our Earth (geography, taking care of the Earth), motion (pushes and pulls, magnets), and astronomy (the Earth, Sun, Moon, and stars; exploring space; astronauts Neil Armstrong and Sally Ride).

History

    This beginning course teaches the basics of world geography through a storybook tour of the seven continents, and provides an introduction to American history and civics through a series of biographies of famous Americans. Supplementary lessons introduce students to symbols that represent American freedom; the laws, rights, and responsibilities of citizens; the cultures and traditions of the United States; and basic economic concepts.

Art

    Students are introduced to the elements of art—line, shape, color, and more. They learn about portraits and landscapes, and realistic and abstract art. Students will learn about important paintings, sculpture, and architecture; study the works and lives of artists such as Matisse, Miro, Rembrandt, Hiroshige, Cezanne, Picasso, and Faith Ringgold; and create artworks similar to works they learn about, using many materials and techniques. For example, students will create brightly colored paintings inspired by Matisse and make mobiles inspired by Alexander Calder.

Introduction to Music

    Kindergarten students learn about music through lively activities, including listening, singing, and moving. Through games and folk songs from diverse cultures, students learn musical concepts such as high and low, or loud and soft. Creative movement activities help students enjoy the music of composers such as Grieg and Haydn. Students will sing along with folk songs, practice moving to music, and listen actively to different kinds of music. They will also understand concepts such as high and low, fast and slow, long and short, loud and soft, as well as identify and contrast beat and rhythm.

Physical Education


First Grade Student

Language Arts Green

    In this course, students receive structured lessons on readiness skills through emphasis on phonics, language skills, literature, and handwriting to help develop comprehension, build vocabulary, and promote a lifelong interest in reading.

Math Plus Green

    This research-based course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. The engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course extends their work with place value to numbers through 100, emphasizing fluency of addition and subtraction facts, and focusing on number sentences and problem solving with addition and subtraction. Students begin work with money, telling time, ordering events, and measuring length, weight, and capacity with non-standard units. Students identify attributes of geometric figures and also extend their work with patterns and data, including representing and comparing data.

Science 1

    Students learn to perform experiments, record observations, and understand how scientists see the natural world. They germinate seeds to observe plant growth, and make a weather vane. Students will also explore topics such as matter (states of matter, mixtures, and solutions), weather (cloud formation, the water cycle), animal classification and adaptation (insects, amphibians, birds, and mammals), habitats (forests, deserts, rain forests), the oceans (waves and currents, coasts, coral reefs), light (how it travels, reflections, and inventor Thomas Edison), plants (germination, functions of roots, stems), and the human body.

History 1

    History 1 kicks off a program that, spanning the elementary grades, provides an overview of world geography and history from the Stone Age to the Space Age. This course takes students through the age of classical civilizations. Supplementary lessons focus on concepts in economics and citizenship.

Art 1

    Following the timeline of K12 History 1, Art 1 lessons include an introduction to the art and architecture of different cultures, such as Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt, Greece, and China. Students will identify landscapes, still lifes, and portraits; study elements of art, such as line, shape, and texture; and create art similar to the works they learn about, using many materials and techniques. For example, inspired by Vincent van Gogh’s The Starry Night, students paint their own starry landscape using bold brushstrokes, and make clay sculptures inspired by a bust of Queen Nefertiti and the Great Sphinx.

Beginning 1 Music

    In this course, traditional games and folk songs from many cultures help students begin to read and write simple melodic and rhythmic patterns. Students are introduced to the instruments of the orchestra through Prokofiev’s classic Peter and the Wolf. They explore how music tells stories in The Sorcerer’s Apprentice and are introduced to opera through a lively unit on Mozart’s Magic Flute. Students sing along with folk songs, practice moving to music, and listen actively to different kinds of music.

Physical Education


Second Grade Student

Language Arts Orange

    This course provides a comprehensive and interrelated sequence of lessons for students to continue building their proficiency in literature and comprehension, writing skills, vocabulary, spelling, and handwriting.

Math Plus Orange

    This research-based course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. The engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course focuses primarily on number concepts, place value, and addition and subtraction of numbers through 1,000. Special emphasis is given to problem solving, inverse operations, properties of operations, decomposition of numbers, and mental math. Students study money, time, and measurement; geometric figures; analyzing and displaying data with new representations; and determining the range and mode of data. Early concepts about multiplication, division, and fractions are introduced.

Science 2

    Students perform experiments to develop skills of observation and analysis and learn how scientists understand our world. They demonstrate how pulleys lift heavy objects, make a temporary magnet and test its strength, and analyze the parts of a flower. Students will explore topics such as the metric system (liters and kilograms), force (motion and simple machines, physicist Isaac Newton), magnetism (magnetic poles and fields, how a compass works), sound (how sounds are made, inventor Alexander Graham Bell), the human body (cells, the digestive system), and geology (layers of the earth, kinds of rocks, weathering).

History 2

    History 2 continues a program that spans the elementary grades, exploring world geography and history from the Stone Age to the Space Age. This course focuses on the time from ancient Rome to the later Middle Ages. Supplementary lessons focus on concepts in economics and citizenship.

Art 2

    Art 2 lessons include an introduction to the art and architecture of ancient Rome, medieval Europe, Islam, Mexico, Africa, China, and Japan. Students will examine elements of art and principles of design, such as line, shape, pattern, and more; study and create self-portraits, landscapes, sculptures, and more; and create artworks similar to works they learn about, using many materials and techniques. For example, after studying Winslow Homer’s Snap the Whip, students paint their own narrative landscape, and design stained glass windows inspired by the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris.

Beginning 2 Music

    This course is for students in grade 2 or 3 who have completed Beginning 1 Music. Through traditional folk songs and games, students learn to read more complicated melodic patterns and rhythms. As students listen to works by great composers, such as Vivaldi and Saint-Saens, they learn to recognize these patterns in the music. Students will sing along with folk songs; read and write music; learn to recognize melody in three and four-note patterns; identify rhythms in music using half notes; become familiar with string and percussion instruments of the orchestra; recognize duple and triple meter; and begin to understand standard musical notation.

Physical Education


Third Grade Student

Language Arts Purple

    In this course, students receive structured lessons in the language arts, a discipline which includes literature and comprehension, writing skills, vocabulary, spelling, and handwriting. The purpose of these lessons is to increase reading comprehension, develop fundamental skills in oral and written communication, build vocabulary, and promote a lifelong interest in reading. This course addresses current thinking in assessment standards.

Math Plus Purple

    This research-based course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. This engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course emphasizes conceptual understanding of the mathematical operations: addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Students make connections between the operations, as well as practice through problem solving, to achieve fluency. The use of problem solving and representing problem situations with equations, which include symbols for unknown values, introduces algebraic thinking. The course addresses fractions through multiple representations, as well as solving real-world problems, which gives students the ability to connect the use of fractions with problem situations in a way that makes sense and creates deeper understanding. The courses addresses geometry and measurement through introductory work on perimeter, area, and attributes of two-dimensional geometric figures, and applying measuring techniques to solving problems involving time, length, capacity, and mass. Throughout the course, problem solving connects individual mathematical skills and concepts in a useful and in-depth way. This course includes standards-based tasks, digital literacy skills, and assessment questions.

Science 3

    Students learn to observe and analyze through hands-on experiments and gain further insight into how scientists understand our world. They observe and chart the phases of the moon, determine the properties of insulators and conductors, and make a three-dimensional model of a bone. Students will explore topics such as weather (air pressure, precipitation, clouds, humidity, fronts, and forecasting), vertebrates (features of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals), ecosystems (climate zones, tundra, forests, desert, grasslands, freshwater, and marine ecosystems), matter (phase changes, volume, mass, atoms), the human body, energy, light, and astronomy.

History 3

    History 3 continues a program that spans the elementary grades, exploring world geography and history from the Stone Age to the Space Age. This course focuses on the period from the Renaissance through the American Revolution. Supplementary lessons focus on concepts in economics and citizenship.

Art 3

    Following the timeline of K12 History 3, Art 3 lessons include an introduction to the art and architecture of the Renaissance throughout Europe, including Italy, Russia, and northern Europe. Students also investigate artworks from Asia, Africa, and the Americas created during the same time period. Students will extend their knowledge of elements of art and principles of design, such as form, texture, and symmetry, and draw, paint, and sculpt a variety of works, including self-portraits, landscapes, and still life paintings. For example, after studying da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, students will use shading in their own drawings and make prints showing the features and symmetry of the Taj Mahal.

Intermediate 1 Music

    Through traditional folk songs, games, and the consistent use of solfege, students learn to read and write a variety of musical patterns and recognize the pentatonic scale. They learn to play simple melodies and rhythms on the recorder, and also learn fundamental concepts in breathing and singing. They become more familiar with the orchestra, especially the woodwind and brass families, and learn about the lives and works of Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. Students will learn to recognize melody in four- and five-note patterns; identify rhythms in music using sixteenths, dotted half notes, and whole notes; and recognize AB and ABA form.

Physical Education


Fourth Grade Student

Language Arts Red

    This comprehensive course covers reading comprehension; analysis; composition; vocabulary; and grammar, usage, and mechanics, including sentence analysis and diagramming. Structured lessons on spelling enable students to recognize base words and roots in related words, while direct and explicit instruction in vocabulary teaches students to identify and clarify meanings of grade level-appropriate and domain-specific words. Lessons are designed to develop reading comprehension, build vocabulary, and help students become more independent readers. The course emphasizes classic literature. Additionally, students read works of nonfiction, as well as four novels selected from a long list of classic titles. This course addresses current thinking in assessment standards.

Math Plus Red

    This research-based course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. This engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course continues to emphasize the understanding of numbers and operations. There is a focus on computational fluency in addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers. The course enhances fluency of operations through application in the solving of measurement, geometry, and data analysis problems using mathematical problem-solving techniques. Students make connections between fraction and decimal representation of numbers. Students study equivalences and relationships between fractions and decimals on the number line and with other models. Students develop algebraic thinking as they work with variables and formulas to solve multistep word problems and as they study patterns and rules. They extend their knowledge of geometry through more in-depth classification of shapes and work with lines, angles, and rotations and the connection of geometric concepts to measurement and problem solving. This course includes standards-based tasks, digital literacy skills, and assessment questions.

Science 4

    Students develop scientific reasoning and perform hands-on experiments in Earth, life, and physical sciences. They construct an electromagnet, identify minerals according to their properties, use chromatography to separate liquids, and assemble food webs. Students will explore topics such as the interdependence of life; plant and animal interactions; chemistry; forces and fluids; the human body; the nervous system; invertebrates; electricity and magnetism; rocks and minerals; weathering, erosion, and deposition; the fossil record and the history of life; and the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic eras.

History 4

    History 4 concludes a program that spans the elementary grades, exploring world geography and history from the Stone Age to the Space Age. This course focuses on the period from the Scientific Revolution to modern times. Supplementary lessons focus on concepts in economics and citizenship.

Art 4

    Lessons include an introduction to the artists, cultures, and great works of art and architecture from the French and American revolutions through modern times. Students will study and create artworks in various media, including portraits, quilts, sculpture, collages, and more; investigate the art of the United States, Europe, Japan, Mexico, and Africa; learn about Impressionism, Cubism, Art Nouveau, and Regionalism; and create artworks inspired by works they learn about, using many materials and techniques. For example, after studying sculptures and paintings of ballerinas by Edgar Degas, students create their own clay sculptures of a figure in motion.

Intermediate 2 Music

    The course begins by introducing notes that are lower or higher than the familiar lines and spaces of the staff. Students expand their knowledge of rhythm and learn about the Romantic period in music. Students also study harmony and practice recognizing pentatonic patterns. Finally, they take a musical trip through Europe, Africa, the Middle East, the Caribbean, Japan, and China.

Physical Education


Fifth Grade Student

Language Arts Yellow

    This course provides structured lessons on reading comprehension; analysis; composition; vocabulary; and grammar, usage, and mechanics. Through emphasis on spelling, students learn relationships between sounds and spellings in words and affixes. Targeted vocabulary instruction develops students’ ability to identify, clarify, and expand on the meanings of grade level-appropriate and domain-specific words. Lessons are designed to develop comprehension, build vocabulary, and help students become more independent and thoughtful readers. Students practice writing as they write a memoir, an editorial, a research paper, a business letter, and more. They learn about parts of speech, punctuation, and research skills. Students study literature in a variety of genres, including fiction, poetry, nonfiction, drama, and novels. This course addresses current thinking in assessment standards.

Math Plus Yellow

    This research-based course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. This engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course builds on student understanding of numbers and operations by making connections between place value, decimals, and fractions; introducing multiplication and division of decimal numbers; and extending understanding of fraction operations. The course focuses on computational fluency in multiplication and division of whole numbers through the use of standard algorithms. The course enhances fluency of operations with whole numbers, fractions, and decimals through application in the solving of measurement, geometry, and data-analysis problems using mathematical problem-solving techniques. Students continue to develop algebraic thinking as they work with variables and formulas to solve multistep word problems, further study patterns and rules, and are introduced to representing problems graphically using the coordinate plane. They extend their knowledge of geometry through the use of the classification of shapes into hierarchies based on their attributes, the introduction of three-dimensional figures and volume, and connecting geometric concepts to measurement and problem solving. This course includes standards-based tasks, digital literacy skills, and assessment questions.

Science 5

    Students perform experiments, develop scientific reasoning, and recognize science in the world around them. They build a model of a watershed, test how cell membranes function, track a hurricane, and analyze the effects of gravity. Students will explore topics such as water resources (aquifers, watersheds, and wetlands), the oceans (currents, waves, tides, the ocean floor), Earth’s atmosphere (weather patterns, maps, forecasts, fronts), motion and forces (pushes or pulls, position and speed, gravity), chemistry (structure of atoms, elements and compounds), cells and cell processes, taxonomy of plants and animals, and animal physiology.

American History A

      The first half of a detailed two-year survey of the history of the United States, this course takes students from the arrival of the first people in North America through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Lessons integrate topics in geography, civics, and economics.
    Building on the award-winning series A History of US, the course guides students through critical episodes in the story of America. Students investigate Native American civilizations; follow the path of European exploration and colonization; assess the causes and consequences of the American Revolution; examine the Constitution and the growth of the new nation; and analyze what led to the Civil War and its aftermath.

Intermediate Art: American A

    Intermediate Art: American A includes an introduction to the artists, cultures, and great works of art and architecture of North America, from pre-Columbian times through 1877. Students will study and create various works, both realistic and abstract, including sketches, masks, architectural models, prints, and paintings; investigate the art of the American Indians, and Colonial and Federal America; and create artworks inspired by works they learn about, using many materials and techniques. For example, after studying John James Audubon’s extraordinary paintings of birds, students make bird paintings with realistic color and texture.

Intermediate 3 Music

    The course introduces students to all the notes of the major scale, from low Sol all the way up to high Do. Students also learn to recognize and sing the natural minor scale. They expand their knowledge of rhythm with simple syncopated patterns. This semester introduces the Modern period in music, with listening activities to help students recognize Modern music and identify pieces by individual composers. Near the end of the year, students explore American folk music as they follow the expansion of the country westward. Finally, they learn to recognize the major forms of classical music: three-part song form, theme and variations, rondo, sonata allegro, and fugue.

Physical Education


Sixth Grade Student

Intermediate English A

    This course is designed to give students the essential building blocks for expressing their own ideas in standard (or formal) English. After an opening focus on paragraph writing, students write a variety of compositions in genres they will encounter throughout their academic careers. The Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics program offers practice in sentence analysis, sentence structure, and proper punctuation. Intermediate English A sharpens reading comprehension skills, engages readers in literary analysis, and offers a variety of literature to suit diverse tastes. This course addresses current thinking in assessment standards.

Intermediate Mathematics A

    Intermediate Mathematics A is the first of a three-year middle school math sequence. This research-based course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving and expands more deeply into concepts of geometry, algebra, and statistics. This engaging course features new graphics and learning tools. Students solve expressions and equations in the context of perimeter, area, and volume problems while further developing computational skills with fractions and decimals. Also in the context of problem solving, students add, subtract, multiply, and divide positive and negative numbers and work with problems addressing net gains and losses. Students solve problems involving ratios, proportions, and percents with an emphasis on both unit rates and constant rates, as well as problems involving direct variation. They learn multiple representations for communicating information, such as graphs on the coordinate plane, measures of center with statistical data, and a variety of data displays. This course also includes standards-based tasks, digital literacy skills, and multiple question types for assessments.

Math 6 – Fundamentals of Geometry and Algebra

    Students enhance computational and problem-solving skills while learning topics in algebra, geometry, probability, and statistics. They solve expressions and equations in the context of perimeter, area, and volume problems while further developing computational skills with fractions and decimals. The study of plane and solid figures includes construction and transformations of figures. Also in the context of problem solving, students add, subtract, multiply, and divide positive and negative integers and solve problems involving ratios, proportions, and percents, including simple and compound interest, rates, discount, tax, and tip problems. They learn multiple representations for communicating information, such as graphs on the coordinate plane, statistical data and displays, as well as the results of probability and sampling experiments. They investigate patterns involving addition, multiplication, and exponents, and apply number theory and computation to mathematical puzzles.

Earth Science

    The Earth Science curriculum builds on the natural curiosity of students. By connecting them to the beauty of geological history, the amazing landforms around the globe, the nature of the sea and air, and the newest discoveries about our universe, the curriculum gives students an opportunity to relate to their everyday world. Students will explore topics such as the fundamentals of geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy; Earth’s minerals and rocks; Earth’s interior; plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, and the movements of continents; geology and the fossil record; the oceans and the atmosphere; and the solar system and the universe.

American History B

    The second half of a detailed two-year survey of the history of the United States, this course takes students from the westward movement of the late 1800s to the present. Lessons integrate topics in geography, civics, and economics. Building on the award-winning series A History of US, the course guides students through critical episodes in the story of America. Students examine the impact of the settlement of the American West; investigate the social, political, and economic changes that resulted from industrialization; explore the changing role of the U.S. in international affairs from the late 19th century through the end of the Cold War; and trace major events and trends in the United States from the Cold War through the first decade of the twenty-first century.

Intermediate Art: American B

    Intermediate Art: American B is designed to complement American History B. Following the same historical timeline, lessons include an introduction to the artists, cultures, and great works of American art and architecture from the end of the Civil War through modern times. Students will investigate paintings done in various styles, from Impressionist to Pop; learn about modern sculpture and folk art; discover how photographers and painters have inspired one another; examine examples of modern architecture, from skyscrapers to art museums; and create artworks inspired by works they learn about.

Music Concepts A

    Students learn the fundamentals of music, as they relate to the piano key, and study a select group of composers and their music. The course covers the staff and the keyboard; extending the staff; and flats, sharps, and scales. Course content is offline. Students complete lessons using the Music Ace CD, student guides, and listening CDs.

Physical Education


Seventh Grade Student

Intermediate English B

    This course continues the development of written and oral communication skills, designed to give students the essential building blocks for expressing their own ideas in standard (formal) English. Students continue to practice writing essays in various genres. They analyze the conventional five-paragraph essay structure, and then move on to learn the form and structure of a variety of essays they will encounter in their academic careers. The Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics program addresses many grammatical topics. Intermediate English B sharpens reading comprehension skills, engages students in literary analysis, and offers a variety of literature to suit diverse tastes. This course addresses current thinking in assessment standards.

Intermediate Mathematics B

    Intermediate Mathematics B is the second of a three-year middle school math sequence that prepares students for success in high school algebra. The course begins by developing an understanding of operations with rational numbers, which is applied to working with algebraic expressions and linear equations. This course also helps students develop understanding of proportional relationships and the use of these relationships to solve problems. Geometry topics focus on constructions of two-dimensional figures; properties of circles; scale factors; and problems involving area, surface area, and volume. Finally, students use the tools of probability and statistics to solve basic probability problems and to make inferences based on population samples. This course aligns to national standards and is designed to focus on critical skills and knowledge needed for success in further mathematical studies, including high school algebra.

Math 7 – Pre-Algebra

    In this course, students take a broader look at computational and problem-solving skills while learning the language of algebra. Students translate word phrases and sentences into mathematical expressions; analyze geometric figures; solve problems involving percentages, ratios, and proportions; graph different kinds of equations and inequalities; calculate statistical measures and probabilities; apply the Pythagorean theorem; and explain strategies for solving real-world problems.

Life Science

    The Life Science program invites students to investigate the world of living things— at levels both large and small—by reading, observing, and experimenting with aspects of life on Earth. Students explore an amazing variety of organisms, the complex workings of the cell, the relationship between living things and their environments, and discoveries in the world of modern genetics. Practical, hands-on lesson activities help students discover how scientists investigate the living world. Students perform laboratory activities and a full unit investigation to learn about the application of scientific methods.

Intermediate World History A: From Prehistory through the Middle Ages

      In this first part of a survey of world history from prehistoric to modern times, K12 online lessons and assessments complement The Human Odyssey, a textbook series developed and published by K12. This course focuses on the development of civilization across a
    12,000-year span: from the Ice Age to the Middle Ages, from cave paintings to stained glass windows, from crude huts to Gothic cathedrals. The course introduces geography concepts and skills as they appear in the context of the historical narrative.

Intermediate Art: World A

    Intermediate Art: World A is designed to complement Intermediate World History A: From Prehistory Through the Middle Ages. Following the same historical timeline, lessons include an introduction to the artists, cultures, and great works of world art and architecture from ancient through medieval times. Students will investigate how artists from different civilizations used various techniques, from painting to mosaic; examine elements of design and styles of decoration, from the spiral to the solar disk; and explore some of the best-preserved works from ancient tombs, including the treasures of Egypt’s King Tut.

Exploring Music

    This course presents the basics of traditional music appreciation through singing and the study of music in history and culture. Students begin by studying some of the most important classical composers, and then study traditional music from around the country and around the world. Finally, they learn how to follow the form of a piece of music.

Physical Education


Eighth Grade Student

Literary Analysis and Composition

    Throughout this course, students engage in literary analysis of short stories, poetry, drama, novels, and nonfiction. The course focuses on the interpretation of literary works and the development of oral and written communication skills in standard (formal) English. The course is organized in four programs: Literature; Composition; Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics; and Vocabulary. In Composition, students continue to sharpen their skills by writing essays in various genres. In Literature, students read “what’s between the lines” to interpret literature, and they go beyond the book to discover how the culture in which a work of literature was created contributes to the themes and ideas it conveys. Students also read and study a variety of nonfiction works. This course addresses current thinking in assessment standards.

Intermediate Mathematics C

    Intermediate Mathematics C is the third of a three-year middle school math sequence that prepares students for success in high school algebra. The course begins with properties of numbers, including exponents, as well as measurement and precision with scientific notation. After using transformations to solve linear equations with one variable, the course presents linear equations and systems with two variables. The course emphasizes modeling with linear relationships, including the use of linear functions to model relationships between bivariate statistical data. Geometry topics include distances, angles, similarity, and congruence with two-dimensional figures and volumes of three-dimensional figures. Finally, students use irrational numbers and the Pythagorean theorem to solve mathematical and real-world problems. This course aligns to national standards and is designed to focus on critical skills and knowledge needed for success in further mathematical studies, including high school algebra. After completing this course, students will be ready to take Algebra I in high school.

Math 8 – Algebra

      Students develop algebraic fluency by learning the skills needed to solve equations and perform manipulations with numbers, variables, equations, and inequalities. They also learn concepts central to the abstraction and generalization that algebra makes possible.
    Students learn to use number properties to simplify expressions or justify statements; describe sets with set notation and find the union and intersection of sets; simplify and evaluate expressions involving variables, fractions, exponents, and radicals; work with integers, rational numbers, and irrational numbers; and graph and solve equations, inequalities, and systems of equations. They learn to determine whether a relation is a function and how to describe its domain and range; use factoring, formulas, and other techniques to solve quadratic and other polynomial equations; formulate and evaluate valid mathematical arguments using various types of reasoning; and translate word problems into mathematical equations and then use the equations to solve the original problems.

Physical Science

    The Physical Science program introduces students to many aspects of the physical world, focusing first on chemistry and then on physics. The course provides an overview of the physical world and gives students tools and concepts to think clearly about atoms, molecules, chemical reactions, motion, electricity, light, and other aspects of chemistry and physics. Among other subjects, students study the structure of atoms; the elements and the Periodic Table; chemical reactions; forces, including gravitational, motion, acceleration, and mass; and energy, including light, thermal, electricity, and magnetism.

Intermediate World History B: Our Modern World, 1400 to 1914

    Continuing a survey of world history from prehistoric to modern times, K12 online lessons and assessments complement the second volume of The Human Odyssey, a textbook series developed and published by K12 This course focuses on the story of the past, from the 15th century to 1914 and the beginning of World War I. The course is organized chronologically and, within broad eras, regionally. Lessons explore developments in religion, philosophy, the arts, and science and technology. The course introduces geography concepts and skills as they appear in the context of the historical narrative.

Intermediate Art: World B

    Intermediate Art: World B is designed to complement World History: Our Modern World, 1400 to 1917. Following the same historical timeline, lessons include an introduction to the artists, cultures, and great works of world art and architecture from the Renaissance through modern times. Students will study various works of art from the Renaissance and beyond; discover great works of art and see how they influenced later artists; compare and contrast works from many civilizations, from paintings to sculpture, architecture, book covers, prints, and more; and create artworks inspired by works they learn about.

Music Concepts

    Students learn the fundamentals of music, as they relate to the piano key, and study a select group of composers and their music. The course covers the elements of rhythm and melody; rhythms, rests, and keys; and minor scales, syncopation, and harmony. Course content is offline. Students complete lessons using the Music Ace CD, student guides, and listening CDs.

Physical Education


High School

Courses assigned based on Placement Tests and/or previous coursework

English Courses
  • Literary Analysis & Composition I
  • Honors Literary Analysis & Composition I
  • Literary Analysis & Composition II
  • Honors Literary Analysis & Composition II
  • American Literature
  • Honors American Literature
  • British and World Literature
  • Honors British and World Literature
  • AP English Language and Composition
  • AP English Literature and Composition
  • Electives: Creative Writing, Public Speaking, Journalism, Gothic Literature *
Math Courses
  • Algebra I
  • Honors Algebra I
  • Geometry
  • Honors Geometry
  • Algebra II
  • Honors Algebra II
  • Pre-Calculus & Trigonometry
  • Calculus
  • AP Calculus AB
  • Probability and Statistics
  • Electives: Personal Finance*
Science Courses
  • Physical Science
  • Biology
  • Honors Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Honors Chemistry
  • AP Chemistry
  • Physics
  • Honors Physics
  • Electives: Environmental Science, Forensic Science, Astronomy *
History Courses
  • US History
  • Honors US History
  • Modern U.S. History
  • Honors Modern U.S. History
  • World History
  • Modern World Studies
  • Honors Modern World Studies
  • Civics
  • U.S. Government and Politics
  • AP US History
  • AP U.S. Government and Politics
  • Electives: Psychology, Sociology, Economics, Anthropology, Archaeology, Contemporary World Issues *
Art & Music Courses
  • Fine Art
  • AP Art History
  • Music Appreciation
  • Electives: Drawing and Design I, Drawing and Design II*
Language Courses
  • Spanish I
  • Spanish II
  • Spanish III
  • Spanish IV
  • AP Spanish Language and Culture
  • French I
  • French II
  • French III
  • French IV
  • AP French Language and Culture
  • Latin I
  • Latin II
  • German I
  • German II
  • German III
  • German IV
Additional Courses
  • Physical Education
  • Skills for Health
  • Nutrition and Wellness
  • Journalism
  • Public Speaking
  • Creative Writing
  • Gothic Literature
  • Personal Finance
  • Economics
  • Environmental Science
  • Forensic Science
  • Astronomy
  • Archaeology
  • Anthropology
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
  • Contemporary World Issues
  • Computer Literacy
  • Image Design and Editing
  • Web Design
  • Game Design
  • Drivers Safety
Additional Requirements: Graduation Project
  • Finding Your Path I – Grade 9
  • Finding Your Path II – Grade 10
  • Finding Your Path III – Grade 11
  • Finding Your Path IV – Grade 12

* Electives are not limited to those listed.

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